Tag Archives: Manga Moveable Feast

Barefoot Gen MMF Day Three

16 Feb

Here are your postings from Day Three:

Marc Sobel of Unattended Baggage, argues in favor of the series in response to Derik Badman’s dislike of the series.

ABCBTom provides an introduction to what he hopes to accomplish this MMF, a comparison of the film version of Barefoot Gen & Grave of the Fireflies and “the misuse and willful misinterpretation of victims’ literature”.

Here are the links from Day Two.

Great postings so far, lets head towards a better tomorrow!

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Barefoot Gen: About the Book(s)

13 Feb

Before  Gen started his plucky journey across Japan, Keiji Nakazawa produced an autobiographical work called Ore wa Mita or I Saw It, focusing more specifically on his experiences as a bomb survivor, how it effected his family (particularly in his mother’s death) and how these events lead him to want to produce a longer work about the struggles Japan underwent.

The 48 page one-shot first appeared in 1972  in the magazine Monthly Shōnen Jump, and was published in America by a company called Educomics under the title I Saw It: The Atomic Bombing of Hiroshima: A Survivor’s True Story in 1982. While it is not readily available today in stores, I was able to find a copy easily and for little money on Ebay.

This work was the spark that lite the fire for Nakazawa’s masterpiece. Barefoot Gen, as we know it today, started publishing in Weekly Shonen Jump in 1973, shortly after the original release of “I Saw It”. The series, for whatever reason (wrong demographic? inappropriate subject material for Jump?), was cancelled after a year & a half, moving between three different magazines (Shimin (Citizen), Bunka Hyōron (Cultural Criticism), and Kyōiku Hyōron (Educational Criticism)). The published works began to be collected in 1975.

While BFG may have not been as wildly successful at the time in Japan, the story in America was a bit different. Starting in 1976, as a way to raise awareness about the bombings of Hiroshima and other worldwide disasters, Japanese peace activists began a Transcontinental Walk for Peace and Social Justice. Two activists, Masahiro Oshima and Yukio Aki had a Japanese copy of Barefoot Gen and shared it with those people who were concerned about how the innocent Japanese people were effected, who then urged them to find a way to have this material translated into English. When the two returned to their homes in New York, they created Project Gen, a non-profit, all-volunteer organization that was able to translate the first four volumes into English in the late 1970s. Project Gen has had a number of ups & downs over the years, as well as various incarnations but the project was finally realized in 2000 when a group of nine Japanese volunteers spent three years completing a translation of all ten volumes!

Keiji Nakazawa knew about and was involved in this project and in 2002, introduced the group to Alan Gleason, a member of the first Project Gen who had a relationship with the San Francisco publisher Last Gasp, who took the unabridged translation and republished the material, in its entirety for an American audience.

These covers is arguably the most accessible and well-known version of the series but I wanted to include a few snapshots of how Barefoot Gen was published otherwise. Enjoy:

Announcing the Next Manga Moveable Feast!

30 Jan

I am happy to announce that starting February 13th til the 19th, A Life in Panels will be hosting the 11th Manga Moveable Feast – Keiji Nakazawa’s Barefoot Gen.

For those of you not familiar with the  series, it chronicles the events of the Hiroshima bombings through the eyes of a six-year-old boy, Gen Nakazawa, as he and the surviving members of his family deal with the aftermath of the bombing. Published by Last Gasp, there are ten volumes in total, as well as two films and a live action adaptation. This is a series that, as you will soon find out, is near and dear to my heart and I am ecstatic to see what kind of articles & opinions this MMF will produce.

If anyone reading this blog isn’t familiar with what the Manga Moveable Feast is, can take a look at Matt (Rocket Bomber) Blind’s handy introduction to the project. If you’d like to participate but don’t have a blog or don’t think the subject is right for the blog you already have, I’d be happy to host your guest pieces during the Feast. Just email me the post at skusek at yahoo dot com.

Here are links to the Feasts that have taken place thus far:

  • February 2010 – Sexy Voice and Robo – Hosted by David Welsh (Manga
    Curmudgeon)
  • March 2010 – Emma – Hosted by Matt Blind (Rocket Bomber)
  • April 2010 – Mushishi – Hosted by Ed Sizemore (Comics Worth Reading)
  • May 2010 – To Terra – Hosted by Katherine Dacey (Manga Critic)
  • June 2010 – Color of… Trilogy – Hosted by Melinda Beasi (Manga Bookshelf)
  • July 2010 – Paradise Kiss – Hosted by MichelleSmith  (Soliloquy in Blue)
  • August 2010 – Yotsuba – Hosted by Robin Brenner (Good Comics for Kids)
  • September 2010 – Afterschool Nightmare – Hosted by Sean Gaffney (A
    Case Suitable for Treatment)
  • December 2010 – One Piece – Hosted by David Welsh (Manga Curmudgeon)
  • January 2011 – Karakuri Odette – Hosted by Anna/Tangognat  (Manga Report)